In this 6-part series on Marketing your Yoga Teacher Training, we’re going to go through the ‘who, what, when, where, how and…why. In this first installment, we’re starting with Why. Not, why market it, but why even offer it?
 
 
Once you get clear about why you would offer yoga teacher training, many other pieces start to fall into place. I’ve included 5 reasons below why offering training can be a real way to support your studio business. And in the coming week, I’ll offer up lots of these other pieces to help you think about whether training is a service you should offer at your studio.
 
 
Yes, there are a lot of training programs around, but there’s a reason for that. As yoga becomes a much more prevalent practice, yoga students are looking for more ways to study. As more people become yoga students, there will inevitably be more people who want to become yoga teachers. Yoga Alliance recently released survey results indicating that there are twice as many people who are interested in teacher training as there are current teachers. Now, not all of these students want to teach, but the interest to study yoga in this way is certainly there!
 

 
If you are in business as a yoga studio, you may consider offering yoga teacher training for a variety of reasons, here are 5:
 

1. Revenue. There, I said it. I  know, you didn’t get into teaching yoga ‘for the money’. I get that. However, if you have moved from being a yoga enthusiast to a yoga teacher to a yoga studio owner…yoga is no longer a hobby for you. It’s your way of life. It’s your business. In order to support your business and yourself, you need to earn the stuff that represents the energy we all exchange for goods and services: money. If yoga students are looking for new ways to study and if more students are interested in teaching yoga, you, as a business owner, need to consider adding it to your product set. It’s not the right path for everyone, for sure. And it’s not the only way, for sure. However, for many studios, it’s a great way to add revenue to their studio, creating a more steady, stable business.

2. You hire yoga teachers. If you’ve been in the yoga studio business for any length of time, you know that teachers come and go. Or, if they stay, they may have frequent schedule changes that affect your business. There are lots of reasons for all the change: sometimes teachers lose interest in teaching or their family situation changes and they need another job or they move away. The reasons are endless! And, typically, there’s a scramble time between hires that causes stress for you and for your students. When you add training at your studio, you create a connection with new teachers which in turn, can create an easier hiring process for your studio – because you know more available teachers!

3. The world of yoga has expanded (greatly!). When I started practicing, yoga classes were either held at a yoga studio or a church basement. Now, there’s Stand Up Paddleboard Yoga, Aerial Yoga, yoga at gyms and at hospitals. It seems the world has become wise to the benefits of yoga and it wants people to teach it! Demand has risen a lot!

4. Not all trainees end up teaching. Some are there to deepen their studies and practice, they are simply looking for a way to learn with other equally-yoga-interested people.

5. Not all trainees will teach at your studio. As mentioned before, yoga is everywhere and people are looking to hire yoga teachers, specifically, RYT 200s. Hiring studios and other locations look for that designation because with that standard comes some assurance for hiring managers that the yoga teacher has completed a training. Some of your trainees will be looking to teach somewhere other that at your studio, but they may be interested in studying with you.

 
 
These 5 are some very good reasons to offer training at your studio. For a studio owner – a business owner – it’s important to keep searching out your options! Got more ideas? Share them!
 
Want to read more about offering and marketing your yoga teacher training? You got it! What, Who, Where, When, How